How many of you have bought hunting land and ended up disappointed?

B

BJE80

Guest
Who has purchased hunting land and ended up disappointed with the hunting on it? Maybe after putting money, time and effort into it you expected more?

Which did you do about it? Sell it and buy something different with the new knowledge you have acquired or did you take the "Build it and they will come" mentality.
 
B

bat man

Guest
Built it so they will come. First 2 years they did not. Starting banging around online, bought a couple books, changed the land and how I access and use it, and they are there now.

Will likely sell that developed piece and get something with more potential to replace it. Wrong piece can only get you so far.
 
M

MoBuckChaser

Guest
There are so many guys from out of state that have bought land in Northern Missouri thinking they will kill a 180 every year. A lot of them last about 3-4 years and sell. My real estate buddy has sold many of the same parcels several times when the owners realize it takes a pile of work to build a place. If you have the genetics in your area, then all it takes is a good plan and time!
 
B

bat man

Guest
I actually decided on the area I picked because it was close to home, cheap, and the DNR was selling 5 tags per guy. Reasoned there must be a boatload of deer there.

OOPS.
 
M

MoBuckChaser

Guest
Because of the MN DNR is why i bought in Missouri! ;)
 
M

MoBuckChaser

Guest
Seems to be a common theme. Pretty sad to think how many MN deer hunting dollars get spent elsewhere when the hunting here could be every bit as good as most anywhere in the US
For me, it was that good in MN. But we have gone straight in the crapper the past ten years! So my dollars go elsewhere until things come around!
 

Jordan Selsor

5 year old buck +
I would think the "build it and they will come" mentality will work anywhere with enough acerage, cover, water and food. I could see how continuous sloutering of your doe's could really put a damper on the plan though. I dont get to worried about genetics
 

Ben.MN/WI

5 year old buck +
I bought some hunting land in northern WI in 2006 primarily because it was a good price and generally the deer herd there was pretty decent. The first season wasn't the best, but we managed to bag a couple does. Year two was a repeat of the first year, but there was some potential. In the next few years we bagged 3 bucks 5.5 and older and a number of other bucks, but more recently the deer hunting has declined. A combination of doe tags, predators and winters took its toll on our area, so now we aren't very picky with what bucks we shoot. We have shot a couple of great bears off my land and the grouse hunting in the general area is world class so those are bonus hunting opportunities that help counter the deer hunting issues. I frequently look at other properties in different areas of WI, but I don't know if I could ever sell that property since I'm pretty attached to it now. I think there's a chance that my 40 tree apple orchard will help the deer hunting on our land, but we're probably a few years from that. There's always something to look forward to I guess.
 

foggy

5 year old buck +
I'm reasonably happy with the land I've bought. Definitely a build it and they will come parcel......and it seems to be working for us. Still.....one always dreams about the "perfect parcel". I wish for a flowing river or stream. If I found the right 40 / 80.....I may add it to our hunting group....mostly for future foggy generations to use. Good affordable hunting land could be a scarce commodity in time to come.
 

bwoods11

5 year old buck +
No never disappointed but some of my land needed improvement. Agree with Stu, limitations are by state/region. Either way it's fun, and I'll have spots for my kids to hunt and that is the key.
 

Jordan Selsor

5 year old buck +
I bought some hunting land in northern WI in 2006 primarily because it was a good price and generally the deer herd there was pretty decent. The first season wasn't the best, but we managed to bag a couple does. Year two was a repeat of the first year, but there was some potential. In the next few years we bagged 3 bucks 5.5 and older and a number of other bucks, but more recently the deer hunting has declined. A combination of doe tags, predators and winters took its toll on our area, so now we aren't very picky with what bucks we shoot. We have shot a couple of great bears off my land and the grouse hunting in the general area is world class so those are bonus hunting opportunities that help counter the deer hunting issues. I frequently look at other properties in different areas of WI, but I don't know if I could ever sell that property since I'm pretty attached to it now. I think there's a chance that my 40 tree apple orchard will help the deer hunting on our land, but we're probably a few years from that. There's always something to look forward to I guess.
Sounds like a cool place! I betcha your persistence will pay off Ben!
 
B

bat man

Guest
Right now, I'm thinking the "best" way to improve hunting on my land is to spend more time getting to know everybody in the area. I think this area may be ripe for developing some type of co-op (not QDMA). Get enough folks in the area to start practicing a bit of trigger restraint and we could make the DNR irrelevant. How to get that done is what escapes me right now :oops:

That would be the hardest part of relocating. I bet I know more of the area hunters than most if not a lll of the locals. I have met a lot of good people who have beer in the fridge I stop and visit.

Buck restraint came fairly easy once guys knew who was on board. Amazing how many of the neighbors never talk to each either when I talk to both, and don't share a property line.

It would be interesting to know how close you can get a $600 per acre piece to a $2,800 acre piece with sweat equity and time. Too many variables I know, but all things being equal, how far can you take it?
 

West Branch

5 year old buck +
I bought family land mainly due to the historical attachment, it helps a lot that the 40 I have borders 560 owned by my brother and another 200 of public land with almost no pressure borders my brother. The main farm has been in our family since 1895. I feel that the whole property has a lot of natural potential. We just need to figure out how to hunt it better and set up different areas for better hunting. Something crazy would have to happen for me to sell.

I don't have any big expectations, hopefully in a couple years our numbers are good enough to shoot 2-3 does a year for some meat. It would be nice to see that there is a 140" buck around every year, which I think is reasonable. Actually shooting it will be a whole different story but maybe we'll figure out how to hunt one of these years.

We also have pretty decent turkey, grouse, and bear hunting, so that helps make it more enjoyable as well.
 

OkieKubota

5 year old buck +
10.JPG #1.JPG Potbellied.JPG We bought ours because it was cheap and wooded...
 

bwoods11

5 year old buck +
My best action this year has been my 44 acres... 16 of which is oak/ash with some planted trees and old pasture. Grown up thick and completely surrounded by tillable for a mile each way.

4 bucks came out last night, yes 4 in minnesota...LOL

One was a 135 inch 10, the others were 2.5 year olds. I was surprised. They came very close but no shot. Next time!!

The reason I posted this is an island of cover can be a real hot spot, something to consider when buying a farm!
Note-- but you have to stay out of it and hunt the edges
 

Ben.MN/WI

5 year old buck +
Sounds like a cool place! I betcha your persistence will pay off Ben!
Our property has a lot of potential and if the deer numbers get back to their former levels I think we could do really well. The hunting was pretty good without any improvements when the deer numbers were higher, so the improvements we've made should really pay off if/when the deer numbers bounce back. But until then we'll keep our deer hunting expectations realistic and also try to enjoy the bear, grouse and waterfowl hunting in our area. Our WI property isn't perfect, but we're still very lucky to have it.
 

tooln

5 year old buck +
My 40 is mixed hardwoods and has 2 creeks running through it. The price was right and only 17 miles from home. It has a park like setting but that's changing since I bought it 4 years ago come January. My biggest problem and regret is I have a lot of Amish neighbors who like to fill the freezer year round and during season will shot anything that moves. I also have some good neighbors but they are outnumber by the bad. Since purchasing I've done some hinging, 2 winters ago I clear cut 3 acres & planted in Norway spruce & did another heavy select cut on 2.5-3 acres and left all the tops laying. I wish I'd have and see more deer but it's coming along a little better every year. I don't regret buying and would only sell if I could find something better & make a profit. My original plan was to see improvements in 3-5 years and it is happening. An orchard is coming once I get the spot ready for it.
 

Ben.MN/WI

5 year old buck +
I've spent a fair amount of time pondering apple trees :rolleyes:

Do you (or anyone for that matter) think that having a producing fruit orchard may increase the carrying capacity of your land? If so, for what period of time (summer through early winter, etc.)? I keep thinking that if a person has a number of trees dropping 3-8 bushels of fruit (at 40 lbs. a bushel) that it should have an impact on the number of deer that use the property. Obviously, also having cover available is paramount to pulling it off.

I've done the calculations about tree #'s, bushels per tree, pounds per bushel, etc., but I really don't think it will cause a noticeable difference in deer numbers since we have good food in our area already. It seems our limiting factor is fawn survival with high predator numbers and also hunting mortality. But I also know that it sure can't hurt to have thousands or millions of extra calories available for the local deer herd - perhaps that will give the deer just a little more fat that will help a few of them drop an extra fawn. I really believe that having an orchard will concentrate the neighborhood deer more on my land and also give me a better chance to harvest them during the hunting season. The properties in my neighborhood are fairly similar right now, but I'm hoping the orchard will make my property stand out. One of my neighbors who shoots some nice bucks over a bait pile next to his mailbox uses apples and swears they can't be beat.

It sure gets old waiting year after year for the bumper crop that everyone seems to talk about. But there's always next year-
 

SD51555

5 year old buck +
I've spent a fair amount of time pondering apple trees :rolleyes:

Do you (or anyone for that matter) think that having a producing fruit orchard may increase the carrying capacity of your land? If so, for what period of time (summer through early winter, etc.)? I keep thinking that if a person has a number of trees dropping 3-8 bushels of fruit (at 40 lbs. a bushel) that it should have an impact on the number of deer that use the property. Obviously, also having cover available is paramount to pulling it off.
I think the carry capacity of your land is limited to its weakest period, and that period is winter. Late dropping apples would probably be a big boon to a property, but if corn and soybean stubble is abundant at the same time, it most likely will provide a shift in forage preference, but carrying capacity maybe no so much. This is the big reason we are focused on winter cover and high quality winter browse on our property.
 

j-bird

Moderator
I think most of us tend to get what we can and then try to make it work for us. Once I got control of my place (I lived and hunted on the property before we had total control of it as it was in an estate trust to my wife and her brother which closed in roughly 2005) I started on the "build it and they will come" dream! It's been a long process but things are starting to take hold. Started hunting the place in 2000. Didn't harvest a single deer until 2002. First multiple harvest season was 2007. We have harvested multiple deer off the property every year since. First notable buck (120" or more) was in 2008. Additional notable bucks came in 2011, 2012 and 2 in 2013. Ever since 2008 we have at least seen a nice deer every season. Major projects include CRP implementation, selective timber harvest and food plot program. It also helps that I have a neighbor that bought some ag field next to me and planted the entire thing in trees (they are in the timber business). The more I increase and improve the cover available the better it gets. I may never see or even shoot a B&C class buck on my place, but it has been very rewarding thus far. I would love to be able to expand and reduce my ag acres - but the money made is helping fund college educatins at he moment. I would look forward to a challenge of starting over, but I would prefer to simply expand my reach right where I am if I could - come on powerball!
 
Top