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TC Encore Pro Hunter 300 Win Mag thoughts

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5 year old buck +
I would suggest a suppressor over a muzzle brake, ESPECIALLY if you have hearing loss, and ESPECIALLY if you are shooting a .300 Win Mag. I use a large Hausken suppressor on my .308, and it is awesome. About a third of the suppressor fits over the barrel. You would need to check that whatever you buy can handle the pressure of the Win Mag, but even a small suppressor will make a world of difference with noise as well as reducing recoil and likely improving accuracy.
 

Bszweda

5 year old buck +
I would suggest a suppressor over a muzzle brake, ESPECIALLY if you have hearing loss, and ESPECIALLY if you are shooting a .300 Win Mag. I use a large Hausken suppressor on my .308, and it is awesome. About a third of the suppressor fits over the barrel. You would need to check that whatever you buy can handle the pressure of the Win Mag, but even a small suppressor will make a world of difference with noise as well as reducing recoil and likely improving accuracy.

If your state allows you to have suppressors I'd do this.
 

yoderjac

5 year old buck +
I would suggest a suppressor over a muzzle brake, ESPECIALLY if you have hearing loss, and ESPECIALLY if you are shooting a .300 Win Mag. I use a large Hausken suppressor on my .308, and it is awesome. About a third of the suppressor fits over the barrel. You would need to check that whatever you buy can handle the pressure of the Win Mag, but even a small suppressor will make a world of difference with noise as well as reducing recoil and likely improving accuracy.

Very good thought. I presume these are by permit from ATF here in the us, correct? Or, is there some technical between a suppressor and silencer? I think these are significantly more expensive, but probably a much preferred solution to a brake from a hearing perspective.

Thanks,

Jack
 

yoderjac

5 year old buck +
Did a quick check on a suppressor/silencer. Looks like the permit is a couple hundred bucks and the ballpark cost for a 300 WM is $1,000.00+ depending on what I'd get. Then there would be the gunsmith cost on top of that...
 

Telemark

5 year old buck +
Did a quick check on a suppressor/silencer. Looks like the permit is a couple hundred bucks and the ballpark cost for a 300 WM is $1,000.00+ depending on what I'd get. Then there would be the gunsmith cost on top of that...

$200 to the ATF for the tax stamp (permit). $600- $1500 for the suppressor/silencer. No idea what your gunsmith charges, but probably a couple hundred bucks?

But what's your hearing worth?

I realized I have tinnitus some years ago, and I have been very careful with my hearing since then. No more clubs or concerts or loud bars. No more shooting without earplugs and muffs. And I use a suppressor whenever possible.

My hearing is worth the cost.
 

yoderjac

5 year old buck +
$200 to the ATF for the tax stamp (permit). $600- $1500 for the suppressor/silencer. No idea what your gunsmith charges, but probably a couple hundred bucks?

But what's your hearing worth?

I realized I have tinnitus some years ago, and I have been very careful with my hearing since then. No more clubs or concerts or loud bars. No more shooting without earplugs and muffs. And I use a suppressor whenever possible.

My hearing is worth the cost.

That is the wrong question. The question is whether the cost of a silencer outweighs the inconvenience of other methods of hearing protection. Total price tag is likely over $1,000. Compare that to the inconvenience of fashioning plugs to go over the hearing aid speaker in my ear canal and wearing them.

Thanks,

Jack
 

yoderjac

5 year old buck +
I've been looking as some different muzzle breaks. It looks like some are designed to redirect most of the sound laterally rather than back toward the shooter. With this kind of design, I can certainly understand how you could deafen your neighboring shooter at the range, but it looks like the shooter would not experience a significant increase in muzzle blast.

Thanks,

Jack
 

Telemark

5 year old buck +
That is the wrong question. The question is whether the cost of a silencer outweighs the inconvenience of other methods of hearing protection. Total price tag is likely over $1,000. Compare that to the inconvenience of fashioning plugs to go over the hearing aid speaker in my ear canal and wearing them.

Thanks,

Jack

That's not how it works, unfortunately. You can't prevent hearing loss from shooting a .300 win mag fitted with a brake with some homemade plugs. It's not just that the decibel are too high, but also the nature of gunshots. There's lots of info on the website for the National Institute of Health. It has been a while since I read up about it, but here is a good place to start:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5634813/#!po=15.7343
 

yoderjac

5 year old buck +
Ummm...Perhaps I wasn't clear. I'm using state of the art hearing aids with fast high impulse cut-off. I have a special hunting program built so they are clipped at 85 db as will as lifting some of the equalizer channels in the frequencies of leaf rustling, turkey gobbling, and such. The only issue is sound that does not go through the hearing aids. Foam ear plugs are typically between 20 and 30 db NRR. A silencer is not going to add more than 20 to 30 db of reduction. The only "Homemade" thing involve here is adjusting foam ear plugs to allow the hearing aid wire to go through them and keep the speaker centered in the ear canal.

Am I missing something? 20db to 30db shouldn't matter (to the shooter) if it occurs on the end of the barrel or the entry to the ear. I guess the only way one could do better is to do both.

Thanks,

Jack
 

swat1018

5 year old buck +
I've been looking as some different muzzle breaks. It looks like some are designed to redirect most of the sound laterally rather than back toward the shooter. With this kind of design, I can certainly understand how you could deafen your neighboring shooter at the range, but it looks like the shooter would not experience a significant increase in muzzle blast.

Thanks,

Jack

The report is intense with a muzzle break, regardless of the style.
 

yoderjac

5 year old buck +
The report is intense with a muzzle break, regardless of the style.

Is that regard to the shooter?
 

Telemark

5 year old buck +
Ummm...Perhaps I wasn't clear. I'm using state of the art hearing aids with fast high impulse cut-off. I have a special hunting program built so they are clipped at 85 db as will as lifting some of the equalizer channels in the frequencies of leaf rustling, turkey gobbling, and such. The only issue is sound that does not go through the hearing aids. Foam ear plugs are typically between 20 and 30 db NRR. A silencer is not going to add more than 20 to 30 db of reduction. The only "Homemade" thing involve here is adjusting foam ear plugs to allow the hearing aid wire to go through them and keep the speaker centered in the ear canal.

Am I missing something? 20db to 30db shouldn't matter (to the shooter) if it occurs on the end of the barrel or the entry to the ear. I guess the only way one could do better is to do both.

Thanks,

Jack

Foam ear plugs will only attenuate 5-10 decibels, regardless of their rating. This has to do with how the ratings are calculated. That is still well within the range of causing hearing loss for a .300 win mag.
 

yoderjac

5 year old buck +
I stand corrected. Your 20-30db NRR rated plugs will give a real-world attenuation of 6.5-11.5 decibels IF worn correctly, likely less if altered or worn incorrectly.

https://www.coopersafety.com/earplugs-noise-reduction

Well, I've see that kind of thing on some reseller's web sites. I'm not sure if this promoting using both plugs and muffs or something. It might even be technically correct referencing so OSHA standard or something. Most of the OSHA stuff is focused on sustained cumulative damage. I'm glad you brought this up as it caused me to go back and look at the documentation for the particular foam ear plugs I'm using. They do not reference a standard compliance, but the directly say that when used as directed, the provide 32 decibels of isolation. Trying to use them with hearing aids, probable makes them somewhat less effective, but I'm sure by less than 10 db.

I've got a browning light semi-auto 10 gauge with a ported rhino choke. I use heavy Nito turkey loads in it. I've had no ringing in my ears following the shot with it. I'm not sure what the noise level of that is compared to a 300 Win Mag.

Thanks,

Jack
 

yoderjac

5 year old buck +
I would never buy a base stock looking to change out rifle barrel calibers with the expectation of an entire rifle/scope being sighted in to where I was absolutely confident of the entire rifle & scope's accuracy with several hundred rounds through it at the range I was planning to hunt at.

On my new 300 WINMAg I purchased 18 months ago, I put 200-300 rounds through it between 100-200 yards. Two months before my trip, I starting seeing a 1.5" - 3.0" variance out of every 6-10 shots from the normal. Drove me nuts as I could not isolate until i found one scope mount screw that was maybe a 1/16th turn off.

I have multiple rifles ... 30-06, 308, .50 cal TC muzzle, etc. All are very good. Can't believe how flat shooting my Ruger Hawkeye 300 WIN Mag is out to 200 yards. No ballistics guy here, just want a rifle that I can be very confident in challenging hunting enviroments. Plan on pushing out to 400 yards this winter.

For what you are talking about Jack ... you could do 2 rifles, a 270 & 300 WINMAG and cover north american and even Africa.

Have Leopold & Nikon scopes, consider Vortex ... former guys with Zeiss I belive, I know have 2 of them, very impressed.


The scope I put on my .30-06 that I'm pretty happy with is a VX-6HD 3-18x44 with CDS. I'm pretty happy with it. It looks like the equivalent Vortex is the Razor HD 5-20x50 FFP. Which model Vortex are you using? What features do you like about it over the equivalent Leupold? Is the glass better to your eye. I can get a slightly better discount from Leupold than Vortex so I'm trying to decided if there is something I might like even better about the Vortex to make the change worth it.

The only change I was planning on making in the scope for the .300 win mag from the one I put on the .30-06 is the reticle. I got the illuminated B&C. My thinking was that I might use it if I needed to make a distance estimate for a quick shot at distance, but in hind sight, that is a 1% situation for me. I'm much more likely to pass on a long shot if it has to be taken quickly because I'm sensitive to wounding and not recovering. So, I'm much more likely to evaluate, range, and use the CDS at long distances. I have a firedot on one of my muzzleloaders and really like it. It is very clean and withe the CDS, I don't need the additional clutter.

Thanks,

Jack
 

Telemark

5 year old buck +
I'm not sure if this promoting using both plugs and muffs or something. It might even be technically correct referencing so OSHA standard or something. Most of the OSHA stuff is focused on sustained cumulative damage. I'm glad you brought this up as it caused me to go back and look at the documentation for the particular foam ear plugs I'm using. They do not reference a standard compliance, but the directly say that when used as directed, the provide 32 decibels of isolation. Trying to use them with hearing aids, probable makes them somewhat less effective, but I'm sure by less than 10 db.

You are almost certainly getting less than 15 decibels of attenuation from your earplugs.

The rating on the package is the NRR rating, which I believe is required on all HPDs sold in the US. Real world performance is usually less than half of the NRR rating. This information is available from the OSHA, NIH, and CDC websites. If your .300 win mag with a brake is 165db, you will likely be exposed to over 140db with each shot. This will likely cause you further hearing loss.
 

yoderjac

5 year old buck +
You are almost certainly getting less than 15 decibels of attenuation from your earplugs.

The rating on the package is the NRR rating, which I believe is required on all HPDs sold in the US. Real world performance is usually less than half of the NRR rating. This information is available from the OSHA, NIH, and CDC websites. If your .300 win mag with a brake is 165db, you will likely be exposed to over 140db with each shot. This will likely cause you further hearing loss.
As I said, there is no NRR rating on this package. Just the simple statement I mentioned. It is debatable how much attenuation I'm losing because of how I'm using them. I certainly don't do this on the range, just hunting which is a few shots a year. I guess I don't have a good feel for how much louder a 300 WM would be compared to my 10 gauge or .30-06. I'm pretty confident things are working sufficiently with my current firearms, but the 300 WM may be different.

Do you (or anyone) know of anyone who has done sound intensity measurement at the shooter position of a 300 WM with and without a muzzle break?

Thanks,

Jack
 

yoderjac

5 year old buck +
Well, I pulled the first trigger. EAB was having a sale and the price was close enough to what I can get directly from TC that I decided to go with one of their barrels. After dong some reading, I decided to go with a 26" barrel. The amount of velocity I'll lose should be small compared the the 28" stock barrel and the accuracy should be slightly better. I went with a chromoly barrel with Weathershield.

Still thinking about the scope. I leaning toward another Leupold.

Thanks,

Jack
 

Telemark

5 year old buck +
I don't think you can go wrong with Leupold scopes.
 
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