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Electric Fence

yoderjac

5 year old buck +
Let me be clear. My outer single strand is NOT connected to the energizer. It does not shock. It does not need to be in my experience. After one shock the deer will be leary of the whole setup and if they attempt to get in they’ll step over the first strand and try to go between the inner strands... and pow.

I actually found energizing all 3 wires on a Gallagher-style fence is important in my case. When deer don't get zapped by the outer wire, they just went under it. The fed on the beans between the inner and outer fences. Once between the fences, they then easily jumped the inner fence. Energizing the outer fence is also important because of the function it performs. It is tape rather than turbo wire for a purpose. I twist it between posts so it more easily catches the breeze and flutters. When I put up a new fence, I put peanut butter on aluminum foil and clip it to the outer fence in spots. Deer will smell then try to lick the peanut butter and get a good zap. There afterwards, the visual cue of the fluttering white tape is associated with the zap and they are less intent on getting inside.

Keep in mind that everything when it comes to deer is relative. There are places where a slight deterrent like "Plot Saver", which is just visual and olfactory, is sufficient to allow beans to establish. This is typically where there are equally attractive food sources in the area. It is basically the "you don't have to outrun the bear, just your buddy" approach. Where there are other good options it may take very little to deter. Where other attractive quality foods are lacking in the area, a higher level of deterrence is required.e

Thanks,

Jack
 

breddick

5 year old buck +
I may have picked up on one key difference. You mentioned deer fed on beans between the strands. I keep the beans inside the inner strands. The deer don’t stand between the strands. They take a straight line through (or attempt to).
With beans between the strands I can see where it could educate them more. I don’t want them spending any extra time between the strands.

another key in my area is to not make the gap between inner and outer too wide. I put my fence up fast and don’t use any actual measuring device. I would say my spacing is more like 30” instead of 36”. I want them as close as I can get them without them wanting to jump all 3 at once. I also put a bigger gap between top and bottom strands on the inner row. I tweak it to highly encourage them to squeeze between inner two.

I’ve found it’s almost an art!

don’t get me wrong some hard headed deer will tough it out and get in no matter what but it stops 90%+ of the browsing.
 

yoderjac

5 year old buck +
My beans did not start between the fences, but that is where they grew to (forage beans). The problem with more narrow spacing between inner and outer fences is that it is less effective in keeping them from jumping over both. The reason we use turbo wire on the inner fence is that deer can see it, but not well. It is hard for them to judge depth which makes them reluctant to jump it. I had a camera on mine and deer only broke in once. It appears the deer was outside and spooked but a coyote or something and jumped it when trying to escape.
 

Booner21

5 year old buck +
I always plant beans outside of the fence to give them something to eat not sure if it makes a difference but I have read that is important or they will tend to go after the part behind the fence harder. I plant about two acres and fence 1.5 they seem to leave the inside ones completely alone.


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yoderjac

5 year old buck +
I always plant beans outside of the fence to give them something to eat not sure if it makes a difference but I have read that is important or they will tend to go after the part behind the fence harder. I plant about two acres and fence 1.5 they seem to leave the inside ones completely alone.


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Yes, I've only e-fenced a small sub-acre section of beans This was back when we had an very high deer density and little native food. My partners thought I was doing something wrong because our beans would not grow. I planted about 5 acres of Eagle forage beans and protected about 3/4 acre as a control. The deer would completely kill Ag beans. They did not seem to be able to kill the Eagle beans, but they kept them naked all summer. The beans inside the fence got 6' tall and my partners finally acknowledged that it wasn't an issue with my planting. When I subsequently planted 5 to 7 acres of forage beans without an e-fence they canopied and grew well.

Another good sacrificial crop is sunflowers. Deer like young sunflower sprouts as much as beans. They are cheaper than soybeans if you are trying to keep deer off beans.

Thanks,

Jack
 
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