Two Ways I have Fenced Apple Trees

sandbur

5 year old buck +
6810cc904d5be36af3a9dd04f2c22a71.jpg

The old way was aluminum window screen for mice protection. Then I used about 10 feet of 2x4 inch welded wire around the tree.

I prefer the older welded wire which was a heavier gauge than what I can find now. The welded wire kept rabbits out.

In this case, branch growth opened up the top of the window screen. The branch growth provides shade for protection against winter sunscauld. Depending on snow cover depth, perhaps a shorter amount of window screen would be sufficient for mice not to girdle the tree.

This tree has received very little pruning or other care as you can see. It is a crab that produces fruit about every other year.

Perhaps this is a good way of protecting trees if you are planting a remote location and don’t have time for giving the tree lots of care.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

sandbur

5 year old buck +
6810cc904d5be36af3a9dd04f2c22a71.jpg

The old way was aluminum window screen for mice protection. Then I used about 10 feet of 2x4 inch welded wire around the tree.

I prefer the older welded wire which was a heavier gauge than what I can find now. The welded wire kept rabbits out.

In this case, branch growth opened up the top of the window screen. The branch growth provides shade for protection against winter sunscauld. Depending on snow cover depth, perhaps a shorter amount of window screen would be sufficient for mice not to girdle the tree.

This tree has received very little pruning or other care as you can see. It is a crab that produces fruit about every other year.

Perhaps this is a good way of protecting trees if you are planting a remote location and don’t have time for giving the tree lots of care.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

dd73d23e3c710caf5c36760e103e0d24.jpg

This method is what I have been using the last few years and at locations where I can give the tree more care.

I use aluminum window screen around the trunk and remove all growth/ limbs to a 3-4 foot level. Some go 5 feet to the first limb.

Fifteen feet of cement reinforcing wire is used to keep the deer out, but rabbits can easily get through the 6 inch openings. The aluminum window screen needs to be kept higher to keep rabbits from girdling the trunk during deep snow winters.

Trees seem to grow taller in less time and should provide fruit faster with pruning.

Sunscauld has more potential for a problem with exposure of the trunk. I paint the exposed trunk white in most cases.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

sandbur

5 year old buck +
6810cc904d5be36af3a9dd04f2c22a71.jpg

The old way was aluminum window screen for mice protection. Then I used about 10 feet of 2x4 inch welded wire around the tree.

I prefer the older welded wire which was a heavier gauge than what I can find now. The welded wire kept rabbits out.

In this case, branch growth opened up the top of the window screen. The branch growth provides shade for protection against winter sunscauld. Depending on snow cover depth, perhaps a shorter amount of window screen would be sufficient for mice not to girdle the tree.

This tree has received very little pruning or other care as you can see. It is a crab that produces fruit about every other year.

Perhaps this is a good way of protecting trees if you are planting a remote location and don’t have time for giving the tree lots of care.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

The trees I have fenced in this way were Manchurian crab and dolgo seedlings. They are big healthy trees. Some of the Manchurians have multiple trunks.

Perhaps someone with more experience would know how this would work with larger apples. A heavier fruit load might break off some of the extra trunks.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Tree Spud

5 year old buck +
I've had poor success with 4x2 fencing. Deer can reach in or push over the top of the fence and have nipped off a number of main leaders. Use the 2x4 when I 1st plant the trees as it is a fast way to protect, then I build the 6x6 cages in 5' diameter remesh and re-cage them. I transfer the 2x4 cages to the pine trees.
 

4wanderingeyes

5 year old buck +
Most of mine are option number 2. The smaller hole stuff isn’t as strong as the heavier wired stuff, and bear just lean on it and climb right on up and snap off my trees and branches.
I have a couple with the smaller hole wire, but around me rabbits are the problem. We have enough wolves around here that they keep the rabbits to a minimum.
 

4wanderingeyes

5 year old buck +
I use to do 12 foot fence around them, but all the apples fall inside the fence. The last ones I made are 10 foot, and I like them better. On bigger trees I may even drop to 9 foot fence.
 

sandbur

5 year old buck +
I've had poor success with 4x2 fencing. Deer can reach in or push over the top of the fence and have nipped off a number of main leaders. Use the 2x4 when I 1st plant the trees as it is a fast way to protect, then I build the 6x6 cages in 5' diameter remesh and re-cage them. I transfer the 2x4 cages to the pine trees.

Most of my 4X2 fencing was done when we had low deer numbers. Good point.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

sandbur

5 year old buck +
I've had poor success with 4x2 fencing. Deer can reach in or push over the top of the fence and have nipped off a number of main leaders. Use the 2x4 when I 1st plant the trees as it is a fast way to protect, then I build the 6x6 cages in 5' diameter remesh and re-cage them. I transfer the 2x4 cages to the pine trees.

The old 4x2 was much heavier. I can’t find it anymore.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Tree Spud

5 year old buck +
The old 4x2 was much heavier. I can’t find it anymore.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Yeah, this newer 2x4 is pretty weak. I sometimes have wire break off when I try to fold and connect to sides.
 

rocksnstumps

5 year old buck +
To add to above I am finding that with 2 x 4 opening fencing it is best to use two t-posts vs just one these days to secure. If I do that can use the smaller dia cages like between 3-4 ft. Offers a little better protection from getting pushed around

Fortunately my t-post supply is free as I ripped out a bunch of old fencing when I first bought the place.

On heavier 6 x 6 mesh have to stay above 4-5 ft dia or some of the bambi's can reach thru openings and nip tops off trees when still young. Generally ok with just 1 t-post.

And some may not like it but with the cheap and numerous crab whips I'm ok with using tubes and getting that growth spurt early from greenhouse effect. The largest dia tubes do seem to help without as many mouse issues vs the narrow ones from the ones they ship nested inside each other. Later come back and yank tube and put a narrow dia of 2 x 4 mesh after top of tree above browse height.

Aluminum wind screen for all!

Add. And bears suck with all so gotta live with that I guess
 
Last edited:

sandbur

5 year old buck +
To add to above I am finding that with 2 x 4 opening fencing it is best to use two t-posts vs just one these days to secure. If I do that can use the smaller dia cages like between 3-4 ft. Offers a little better protection from getting pushed around

Fortunately my t-post supply is free as I ripped out a bunch of old fencing when I first bought the place.

On heavier 6 x 6 mesh have to stay above 4-5 ft dia or some of the bambi's can reach thru openings and nip tops off trees when still young. Generally ok with just 1 t-post.

And some may not like it but with the cheap and numerous crab whips I'm ok with using tubes and getting that growth spurt early from greenhouse effect. The largest dia tubes do seem to help without as many mouse issues vs the narrow ones from the ones they ship nested inside each other. Later come back and yank tube and put a narrow dia of 2 x 4 mesh after top of tree above browse height.

Aluminum wind screen for all!

Add. And bears suck with all so gotta live with that I guess

I used no fence posts with the old 2x4 fencing. I have been reusing most of it on younger trees.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

H20fwler

5 year old buck +
If I have to use the 4”X2” fencing I make sure it’s the 5’ tall stuff and that usually detours most of the fence pushing/smashing over the top here.
I noticed our Menards had some that was really thin welded wire not like they used to carry.
Given a choice it’s hard to beat the concrete remesh for fruit tree fencing.
 

Prof.Kent

5 year old buck +
I've had poor success with 4x2 fencing. Deer can reach in or push over the top of the fence and have nipped off a number of main leaders. Use the 2x4 when I 1st plant the trees as it is a fast way to protect, then I build the 6x6 cages in 5' diameter remesh and re-cage them. I transfer the 2x4 cages to the pine trees.
My 2x4 fencing works great against deer, but it is 5 foot high. Once the tree gets above 5' it is mostly safe until limbs hang down over the fence.
 

rocksnstumps

5 year old buck +
Yep 5 ft high for all fencing and tubes or you will be losing tops on a lot of trees. Sometimes that is not even enough if you plant on a hill/uneven ground and they get on the uphill side. For that may need to space fence higher off ground and use more stakes or have added just a short bit of the cheap rabbit fencing. Most of my hill spots are not too steep and not required though.
 

westonwhitetail

5 year old buck +
What's the advantage of the aluminum window screen vs. the white corrugated plastic tree protectors?
 

Mortenson

5 year old buck +
Those make rodent condos.
 

Bowsnbucks

5 year old buck +
I agree they don't make 2" x 4" fencing heavy like past days. Thin & cheap now. Concrete re-mesh cages and aluminum window screen have worked well for us with decent deer numbers and lots of mice & voles. We just need bear repellent.
 

Bowsnbucks

5 year old buck +
I have never had that happen?
You're lucky. We used plastic tubes in the past - the rodents moved in, built nests, and chewed off all the bark to the top of the tubes over winter. Never again. Aluminum window screen for us - 24" to 30" tall to account for snow depth.
 
Top