Direct Plant | Apple Tree Root Stock

TreesuitSC

5 year old buck +
What are your thoughts on purchasing root stock and planting it upon receiving.

Then allowing it to grow to sufficient size and grafting it with a simple bark graft. That is the only method I have really tried. It’s the same I use with the American Persimmon.
 

Turkey Creek

5 year old buck +
Wont be an issue other than you will need to protect it like you would a newly planted tree. Also be able to supplement watering if need be.
 

b116757

5 year old buck +
I have much better success with the direct planting and bark grafting a year or two latter than I do with bench grafts but my bench grafting technique is sketchy at best.
 

Telemark

5 year old buck +
What are your thoughts on purchasing root stock and planting it upon receiving.

Then allowing it to grow to sufficient size and grafting it with a simple bark graft. That is the only method I have really tried. It’s the same I use with the American Persimmon.

It's a great idea, and I prefer it.

The benefit of bench grafting is convenience. You can have all your tools and wax there beside you, and you can work at a table or bench. It's great if you are doing a lot of grafts and have space to put them while they heal.

Field grafting using bark or side grafts is dead easy and highly successful. The downside is taking all your equipment into the field and crawling around on the ground to do it.
 

chickenlittle

5 year old buck +
You’ll be farther ahead bench grafting and planting out anything you have scionwood for. If any grafts fail, field graft them later.
 

Mozark

5 year old buck +
I don't bench graft any more, I plant and protect the rootstocks when received. After they have been in the ground two years, I go back and graft using a simple cleft. It is the easiest fastest way I have found. I have a much higher rate of takes especially with pears and if I happen to loose one or two im not out much, time or money.
 

TreesuitSC

5 year old buck +
Thank you all. I appreciate the help.

Kind of new to Apples. Should you tube them or not?
 

AtomApple

5 year old buck +
Thank you all. I appreciate the help.

Kind of new to Apples. Should you tube them or not?
YouTube is a great source of information !

from what I’ve read on here it seems to NOT be recommended to use tree tubes. Sounds like fruit trees are more susceptible to fungus, etc with tubes on. Cages and screens seems to be the most successful strategy.
 

AtomApple

5 year old buck +
I don't bench graft any more, I plant and protect the rootstocks when received. After they have been in the ground two years, I go back and graft using a simple cleft. It is the easiest fastest way I have found. I have a much higher rate of takes especially with pears and if I happen to loose one or two im not out much, time or money.
Do you cleft graft where the Scion size matches the leader? I have heard rumors of trees being able to survive in colder zones by grafting higher.
 

Mozark

5 year old buck +
Do you cleft graft where the Scion size matches the leader? I have heard rumors of trees being able to survive in colder zones by grafting higher.
Im in mid zone 6, I graft apple and pear close to the ground. Have thought of trying that with asian persimmons that might not be hardy here.
 

b116757

5 year old buck +
Many many folks disagree with me on here and prefer cages over tubes I have had pretty good luck with the tubes myself but I do have a high hawk population that keeps vermin in check and out of my tubes.
 

b116757

5 year old buck +
My recommendation in zone 3 or colder is burying the grafts and let the scion wood self root so the likelihood of graft failure’s do to cold is eliminated.
 

bigboreblr

5 year old buck +
Treesuit,

Guessing your in South Carolina. Drought might be your top concern. I'd plant (2) bareroots about 18 inches apart, fine mesh cage the trunks with 18 inches of 1/4" mesh, then put your 4 or 5ft tall cages, 10-15ft of cage in a circle around the 2 trees. If both survive a year or two, then dig one up in the fall and move.

Using 4 pallets to make a cage would be a decent idea too. It would shade the trees a touch to prevent too much heat stress on the new trees.

Sandier soils usually B118 is considered better. However, they say M111 is more drought tolerant. Since most southern states have sept hunts, you could just plant a dolgo rootstock or transcendant and just use that for your trees. To get oct/ nov trees, you leaning more towards grafted varieties. I'd check the chill hours on them before decieding to not graft them. There are numerous crabs out there that are true to seed and you may not need to graft.

Most folks have their hunting spot away from their home. I'd plant one or two of the varieties you really want at home. This way you'll have tons of scionwood in 2 or 3 years, Still have a few spare twings the 1st year in. In zone 8 SC, you're not going to have alot of chill hours. There's a inhibitor hormone that get used up during cold days. The tree need enough time in "winter" to work. MY guess SC is 600 or less chill hours.


Pink Lady, Fuji, and Granny Smith are common low chill hour varieties. With the nursery specific deer crabaaple varieties, I would email them and see if they know of anyone who had success in your zone.

Willis orchard has pretty mixed reviews by folks on this forum. However, they are close to you in GA. You can atleast get an idea what varieties might grow well there. A few members who regular this forum have apple trees in florida too.
 
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