designing 71 acres in Kansas ag

b116757

5 year old buck +
Osage orange for me is a love/hate relationship canopy grown trees will be straight and there is no better fence post tree period. Out in the open they are brushy disasters good for very little to me. Easy to kill however if not where you want them Remedy Ultra/diesel fuel for basel treatment pretty much any time of year but spring sap flow. Remedy Ultra water with surfactant as a foliar spray.
 

ksJoe

5 year old buck +
I think Picture this is a great app but it's certainly not immune from being wrong in many occasions.
I don't doubt that, but compared to the free alternative, it is a huge improvement. I'm happy to have something that is usually correct.
 

ksJoe

5 year old buck +
thanks for the suggestions @Troubles Trees
Your comments fit my general plan, but the specifics are helpful. Everyone seems to have a little different take on the specifics, so that helps fill out my options.
On deer patterns: after rain, there are tracks all over the property. On trail cams I'm seeing them often in morning, evening, and overnight. Lots of singles and pairs, but also groups of up to 5-6 deer at a time. The only time of day I don't see much traffic is mid day. Its surprising, they really seem to hit everywhere. I had a trail cam 10 feet from the fence along the highway, pointing somewhat towards the highway. I wanted to figure out what was living in a hole by the fence. In a week I got several deer pictures just in that little feild of view by the highway. There is a plant in the fence that multiple deer came to eat. On my next trip out, I'll figure out what it is. I see evidence of bedding in many areas. In the timber, but also any area with high grass gets beeding too.
So like you're saying, I think my value opportunity is in cover/bedding and adding diversity to the food options beyond big ag. And I have more water than most of Kansas, so I should be able grow whatever I want.
6 months in, I'm very pleased with this land.
 

bigboreblr

5 year old buck +
KSjoe,

Just saw your reply. Definitely open up those watering holes. Thinking about it more, do it somewhat conservatively. You could end up digging it too much and having the water not puddle up as much.

MY experiences hunting in AG, things change very quickly once the area is harvested. Having some food plot coupled with close cover. Even a maze of fallow shrubs with narrow 30ft or so rows of late season forage. Even making the food plot spot bigger with taller grass on the edges would be good too.

Early season, itll be hard to get them out of that corn. Thats where that water is going to work.

A person who I spoke with alot on the old cabelas forum had a small parcel near large ag did very well with only 2 things. He maintained the area shrubby by just keeping the area fallow, but mowed. Kept it to meandering paths that doubled as shooting lanes. Then he made a watering hole. A watering tub that kept itself filled with a 275 gallon tub.
 

ksJoe

5 year old buck +
Definitely open up those watering holes. Thinking about it more, do it somewhat conservatively. You could end up digging it too much and having the water not puddle up as much.

Midsummer we had a dozer out to do some erosion repair and building a pond. The drought is extreme enough that the spring fed creek quit flowing and the pond we built with the dozer is still dry.

But - while we had the dozer, I did an experiment in one of the wet areas. I spent just a few minutes and scrapped off a couple feet of dirt to see what would happen. This picture is a month after pushing dirt with the dozer, right before I started playing with the towable backhoe. Even in the extreme drought it puddled a foot of water.
1667338079344.png

Since it puddled some, I thought digging down would get me more water. So I spent an afternoon playing on the towable backhoe:
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68411227309__A8F071B9-35AF-42EC-BEDD-DF601A003FF6.JPG

A week or two later, the water filled in some (this pic is probably a month or so ago):
1667338253391.png


A week ago we got an inch of rain, and it filled in more. I think this is the result of the water table recovering about a foot, and not the result of runoff. That inch of rain produced virtually no runoff. The creek still has not flowed any water, but now does have a few spots holding a few inches. This is the current status. At the deep end, it's at least 3 feet deep.
IMG_2167.JPG

On the news, they still say we're in "extreme drought." The creek has not flowed water since early summer, so I'm curious how high the water will get in the spring. This started out as a wet low spot between two small hills, that produces a trickle of water to the creek when we're not in a drought. Now I'm wishing I pushed the pile of dirt another 20 yards when I had the dozer.

MY experiences hunting in AG, things change very quickly once the area is harvested.
That's what I saw! from mid summer until a couple weeks ago the deer mostly disappeared. Instead of seeing frequent groups of 5+ deer, I'd see one or two occasionally. Fortunately, they seem to have come back in the last couple weeks.
 

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b116757

5 year old buck +
We got about 2.5 inches and no runoff at all took that much water just to close the cracks in my yard. I did a bit of terrace work on the new farm this summer to pull more runoff into an 1 acre pond but we didn’t really have any runoff so I still don’t know if my little terrace project was a success or not. I could see in satellite images that it appeared water was bypassing the pond in one area so I tried to remedy that. It really looked like the previous owner had maybe tried using a one bottom plow to do what I did with the crawler he cut 8-10” for 175’ I dug 3’ to almost nothing for 320’

Yellow is runoff missing pond
Black is his terrace
Orange is where I built the new terrace
 

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sandbur

5 year old buck +
Midsummer we had a dozer out to do some erosion repair and building a pond. The drought is extreme enough that the spring fed creek quit flowing and the pond we built with the dozer is still dry.

But - while we had the dozer, I did an experiment in one of the wet areas. I spent just a few minutes and scrapped off a couple feet of dirt to see what would happen. This picture is a month after pushing dirt with the dozer, right before I started playing with the towable backhoe. Even in the extreme drought it puddled a foot of water.
View attachment 47005

Since it puddled some, I thought digging down would get me more water. So I spent an afternoon playing on the towable backhoe:
View attachment 47003
View attachment 47004

A week or two later, the water filled in some (this pic is probably a month or so ago):
View attachment 47007


A week ago we got an inch of rain, and it filled in more. I think this is the result of the water table recovering about a foot, and not the result of runoff. That inch of rain produced virtually no runoff. The creek still has not flowed any water, but now does have a few spots holding a few inches. This is the current status. At the deep end, it's at least 3 feet deep.
View attachment 47009

On the news, they still say we're in "extreme drought." The creek has not flowed water since early summer, so I'm curious how high the water will get in the spring. This started out as a wet low spot between two small hills, that produces a trickle of water to the creek when we're not in a drought. Now I'm wishing I pushed the pile of dirt another 20 yards when I had the dozer.


That's what I saw! from mid summer until a couple weeks ago the deer mostly disappeared. Instead of seeing frequent groups of 5+ deer, I'd see one or two occasionally. Fortunately, they seem to have come back in the last couple weeks.

How far does that backhoe reach?

Are they available for rent in any areas?

I don’t imagine it is legal in Minnesota, but I have heard of a guy taking a shovel to an old waterhole during a dry year. That guy was probably a lot younger than he is now.

;)


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

ksJoe

5 year old buck +
How far does that backhoe reach?
This is what it is, and what the specs are. It digs 80" It works impressively well for what it is. Dirt removal is a challenge when digging a hole, because there is only a 60 degree swing on the bucket. For digging a long narrow trench it would make good time. Its a light weight machine, so it forces the operator to develop good technique since you can't rely on the weight of the machine.

Are they available for rent in any areas?
I've never seen one for rent. The few I saw listed for sale used where nearly the cost of new, and very far away from me. I was thinking of lots of little dirt projects, and looking at rental costs, and annoyed that the close rental place won't let me tow anything with my tacoma (7,000lb towing capacity) because it isn't' a full size truck. And this was only 3500 new, so I ordered one.
If you search for it on Northern Tool's website, the initial search result says free shipping to the store. That's a mistake, they won't ship it to the store. After ordering, they email to confirm $500 shipping is acceptable. I politely asked for "that free shipping to the store the website said I could do". After a few emails and a bit of delay, they waved the $500 and just charged me $85 for liftgate fees. Harbor freight also sells one, but theirs has a smaller engine and is slower (but as I understand it does have highway rated tires).
I also bought a 39" bucket intended for a different machine. I need to rework the bushings so the bucket fits this machine, then I'll be able to move mud a lot quicker and easier.


I don’t imagine it is legal in Minnesota, but I have heard of a guy taking a shovel to an old waterhole during a dry year. That guy was probably a lot younger than he is now.
When the NRCS techs were out to advise on my erosion repair options, I specifically asked about the seeps. They said I can do whatever I want with them, no permit required. I don't know if that's correct or not, but they know a lot more about that than I do, so I didn't argue. I'm sure some states are a lot more picky.
 

bigboreblr

5 year old buck +
That improvement looks great. May want to backfill the sides a touch with something that wont be so muddy. Small crushed stone or sand. Can even put down excavation or landscaping frabric on the sides and some stone.
 

buckdeer1

5 year old buck +
Being able to do anything on those seeps is why it's good not to get it designated as a wetland.
 
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