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Clearing trees

AtomApple

5 year old buck +
I have some trees I want to clear to open up some space for an orchard.
They consist of Birch, Maple, and Basswood. I don’t want to just drop them and leave them. My question is, when is the best time to saw them into smaller sections? Do you cut them into small sections when the wood is still green, or let them sit a year or two to dry out? I figure if I were to split the wood eventually, that would be a year or two of drying out first.

Thanks
AA
 

yoderjac

5 year old buck +
I don't think it matters much. Seasoned wood is a little easier to cut. I'd just cut it when it is convenient.
 

Telemark

5 year old buck +
I usually cut it and split it green. Then stack it and leave it covered for two years.
 

Dogshooter

Yearling... With promise
Cut and spit while it’s still green. Much easier. If you leave birch lay on the ground with the bark on it will rot super fast. Makes great firewood but you have to get it split right away. Basswood isn’t much good for firewood, very light wood when dried out and burns up super quick.
 

b116757

5 year old buck +
Dogshooter is correct birch is good for firewood as long as it’s cut and split and stacked quickly basswood is great for carving but not really much else I would process it all pretty quickly if it was me.
 
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Bowsnbucks

5 year old buck +
Most hardwoods are much easier to cut and split when green. I've been cutting firewood for over 40 years, and dry wood is MUCH tougher to split - even with hydraulic splitters. I've cut & split oak, maple, ash, hickory, cherry, and birch. Work up your wood when it's fresh cut - then stack & cover with a tarp ( only on the TOP of the pile - NOT the whole pile !! ) You want air flow to the sides of the pile to dry your wood. I only let my tarps hang down over the sides of my piles about 6" to 8 " from the top. That way rain & snow can drip off and air can still get to the ends of the cut pieces. I weigh the tarps down with rocks or bricks so they don't blow off. GREAT results. Hope that helps.
 
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cavey

5 year old buck +
Green and Green... cut and split...
 

sandbur

5 year old buck +
Most hardwoods are much easier to cut and split when green. I've been cutting firewood for over 40 years, and dry wood is MUCH tougher to split - even with hydraulic splitters. I've cut & split oak, maple, ash, hickory, cherry, and birch. Work up your wood when it's fresh cut - then stack & cover with a tarp ( only on the TOP of the pile - NOT the whole pile !! ) You want air flow to the sides of the pile to dry your wood. I only let my tarps hang down over the sides of my piles about 6" to 8 " from the top. That way rain & snow can drip off and air can still get to the ends of the cut pieces. I weigh the tarps down with rocks or bricks so they don't blow off. GREAT results. Hope that helps.

Each climate is different, but I sold birch firewood in my college days. I elevated the stack on a few sticks and always placed it with the bark side up after splitting. It was left uncovered through the summer, but usually moved under cover by fall/winter. Same thing for oak.


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TreeDaddy

5 year old buck +
Each climate is different, but I sold birch firewood in my college days. I elevated the stack on a few sticks and always placed it with the bark side up after splitting. It was left uncovered through the summer, but usually moved under cover by fall/winter. Same thing for oak.


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Posting at 2:28 AM?

You got me beat by a couple of hours

Im up usually around 4

bill
 

AtomApple

5 year old buck +
Thanks for the tips.
saw wear and tear & ease of splitting were my main concerns
 

sandbur

5 year old buck +
Posting at 2:28 AM?

You got me beat by a couple of hours

Im up usually around 4

bill

I was up with some pain after hernia surgery. Better today.


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Tree Spud

5 year old buck +
Birch & basswood will make good firewood. For me, green or dry doesn't matter, it's when I can get to dropping nd cutting.

If you drop a tree and can't cut and clear same day, make sure main trunk is propped to keep it off of the ground. Ground contact will accelerate decomposition.
 

TreeDaddy

5 year old buck +
I was up with some pain after hernia surgery. Better today.


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Glad to hear you are better

A very painful procedure

All the best for a complete recovery

bill
 

Bowsnbucks

5 year old buck +
I was up with some pain after hernia surgery. Better today.
You didn't need to spend all that money on surgery in a hospital Bur. I have some nice baling wire, 1/4" hardware cloth, and a new roll of duct tape. JD and Crown Royal for pain. :emoji_astonished::emoji_grin:

I hope you're feeling better and are up to snuff soon, buddy !!!:emoji_thumbsup: Go easy.
 

sandbur

5 year old buck +
You didn't need to spend all that money on surgery in a hospital Bur. I have some nice baling wire, 1/4" hardware cloth, and a new roll of duct tape. JD and Crown Royal for pain. :emoji_astonished::emoji_grin:

I hope you're feeling better and are up to snuff soon, buddy !!!:emoji_thumbsup: Go easy.

I told Doc I forgot to bring in the window screen but he had some left after remodeling.

I have fixed hundreds of hernias but didn’t think I wanted to work on myself.

;)


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sandbur

5 year old buck +
Boy, did we steal this thread.

Sorry.


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White Oak

5 year old buck +
I don't know if it's the best time, but after hunting season January, February and March are the only times I fool with cutting and thinning trees (unless something falls in the yard or fields and needs to be removed) . Plus Don't have to worry about bugs , ticks and snakes and sweating to death here in the south.
 

Bowsnbucks

5 year old buck +
I like to cut firewood in October and November for the following year ( if I've killed my deer in archery season! ) and March & April here in Pa. Temps are good for cutting, and bugs / snakes aren't a bother yet.
 

AtomApple

5 year old buck +
I don't know if it's the best time, but after hunting season January, February and March are the only times I fool with cutting and thinning trees (unless something falls in the yard or fields and needs to be removed) . Plus Don't have to worry about bugs , ticks and snakes and sweating to death here in the south.
The best time, is when you have time.

it’s not on any hunting ground, just clearing some trees for a home orchard. It is next to deer areas, so it should also feed wild life, but I haven’t had anything more than a spike with it’s mommy on camera on my actual property.
 
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